Wednesday, December 07, 2005

What Happens to a Rant Deferred?

Some tidbits:

  • I was all set to lash out after being bombarded, first in the U.S. Open tennis coverage and now in a Saab commercial, with the moronic techno-whatever song whose main (only?) lyrics are a muffled "ready steady go." (Are today's youth so callow that "ready, set, go" is too much to comprehend?) But a Google search (due diligence isn't dead, folks) revealed something I apparently should have known: The phrase has a long and illustrious history. I still don't get it.

  • I feel a little slimy about reproducing this bit of e-mail correspondence, even though I am steering clear of any identifiable details, but it's just too good. Apparently I'm Mr. Permissive! (This, no doubt, is what Stephen Jones's rebellious child would sound like.)

    I just have to say something [about "Rules That Aren't"]. Being an editor do you not need to be a "stickler" in grammar? It is not what sounds best but what is grammatically right. That is what is wrong with the students coming into the colleges today. People are not focusing on grammar but what sound right. This is not right. Some children learn to read from the parents reading articles in the newspaper. So, if you write it wrong they learn the wrong grammar at such a early age.
    My reply was patient and helpful, in case you're wondering.

  • I know somebody who lives in a building named after Langston Hughes but isn't all that clear about who Langston Hughes was. This is à propos of nothing, but I just had to find something to tie things together with that headline. (Also, if you don't know the poem I'm alluding to, learn it. If you know "raisin in the sun" only out of context, you're missing out.)

  • 2 comments:

    MuPu said...

    You'll find that "ready, steady, go" is normally used in most English-speaking countries, but not in the United States. "Ready, set, go" is an Americanism. A socio-linguistic note: Immigrant children seem to pick up the American version from playground chatter, while those who come to the U.S. as adults tend to use the phrase they learned in their countries of origin.

    Stephen Jones said...

    My reply was patient and helpful, in case you're wondering.
    I'm glad you wrote him right.