Thursday, September 27, 2007

Spot the Allusion


There was neither the time nor the space nor the newsiness to write much of a headline for the in-between edition, so I slapped on something with one of those teeny little throwaway doesn't-matter-whether-you-get-it allusions. Anybody get it?

9 comments:

Paul said...

I doubt this is what you were shooting for, but I can't get the musical "1776" out of my head. Those who have seen the show, or the movie, know that the New York delegation to the Continental Congress never voted on an issue -- at least until the very end, the vote on independence, when it really counted. Until that point they always abstained ... courteously.

How's that for reaching for an allusion?

Paul said...

And they just quoted your headline on the Today show! Sadly, they didn't play "guess the allusion."

Phillip said...

Nope. Must be too early to think.

meaplet said...

"New York abstains, courteously." From 1776, right?

Bill said...

Yep, Paul and Meaplet have it. That elementary-school screening of "1776" has stayed with me.

nc said...

I thought it was "North Carolina abstains, courteously."

David said...

The North Carolina congressman says something like "North Carolina yields to South Carolina." Them after S.C. (John Cullum) votes, N.C. votes the same as S.C.

Google said...

Right, except the South Carolina delegate in "1776" is Edward Rutledge, who sings "Molasses to Rum".

Google said...

OK, so John Cullum presumably *played* Edward Rutledge... I guess this is a style question: cite the actor or cite the character? I would have assumed the latter, unless a specific production is being referenced.